Kangaroo Mother Care Can Help Reduce 3.6 Million Newborn Deaths Worldwide

Aug 24, 2017 // By:admin // No Comment

Can you believe that in this day and age, there are still 3.6 million newborn deaths worldwide every year? Shocking isn’t it… and this is in spite of the fact that considerable progress has been made over the last two decades. According to research in the area of Perinatology, many countries and regions have made significant strides over the last five years. However, there is huge variation in the progress made when you compare countries and regions.

The following is a summary of the progress observed in different parts of the world over the last five years:
In Asia, South East Asia nations such as China have made considerable progress. Pakistan has been the sole nation in Asia that did not make much progress in combating new born deaths
Africa continued to make progress though at a slow and steady pace. 1.2 million families in Africa still lose a baby every year.
Ten countries with the world’s largest populations account for 2.3 million of new born deaths. In India alone, 1 million new born infants die each year.

One of the solutions that world leading health experts have identified, that could reduce the incidence of new born deaths is improving skilled care at birth and having much needed resources available, to compliment Kangaroo Mother Care. Many of the new born deaths occur when infants are born prematurely. Premature infants can be born weighing only 600 grams can be very tiny, fragile and require specialized care. Health professionals in some countries lack the necessary expertise, resources and facilities to care for pre-term babies. Mothers too are not aware that they can improve their children’s chances of survival through Kangaroo Mother Care.

Kangaroo Mother Care is inexpensive, easy to learn and greatly improves the chances of premature infant survival. The concept was “borrowed” from the manner Kangaroos in the wild take care of their young one’s. Doctors have proven that a preterm child can benefit greatly from Kangaroo Mother Care. Some of the benefits include; temperature regulation, regulation of breathing, improved breast feeding and self latching and hence increased weight gain and, reduced risk of infant infections.

How is Kangaroo Mother Care Practised?

It is quite simple to provide Kangaroo Mother Care to an infant. It involves the Mother or Father sitting upright and holding the preterm baby on their chest skin to skin. The contact has to be skin-to-skin to derive the greatest benefits. The child is then covered with the hospital gown or some covering for warmth. The sound of the parents breathing; voice and heartbeat soothe the child. This calming effect on the child ensures that the baby spends less time crying and more time feeding. Feeding well ensures that the child gains weight which is crucial for survival. It has also been established that the baby’s immune system receives a massive boost from this kind of care the baby has a decreased risk of getting an infection. The Mom or Dads breathing helps regulate the infant’s breathing and pulse rate. Body temperature also regulates to keep the infants temperature just right. The only prerequisite needed for Kangaroo Mother Care to commence is to have Moms and Dads that understand that it is great for their newborn baby. Once they know this, there is no reason why Kangaroo Mother Care should not be started and preferably from the moment of birth.

Clearly, Kangaroo Mother Care does and can go a long way in reducing infant mortality in many countries and, it doesn’t cost a dime.

For more information on the benefits of kangaroo mother care, please visit http://themiracleofkangaroomothercare.com”>http://themiracleofkangaroomothercare.com your online resource for natural parenting and newborn care. Tony and Nyrie Roos are one of the internet’s foremost resources on the education and application of Kangaroo Mother Care.

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